The Ways Your Parenting Language and Approach Impact Your Child

Kids learn more from our examples than any lecture. This includes how we communicate, face obstacles, manage anxiety and accept feedback. This can be challenging on a “good day,” never mind during a pandemic. If there were ever a time when kids are looking to parents for ways to process and interpret the uncertainty and fear associated with the current health crisis, it’s now. If there were ever a time when parents needed information and support to help them do just that, it’s now. Concurrently, there’s a powerful opportunity for you to learn about the brain and use that knowledge to your advantage in your parenting. How do you know if your parenting approach could use an upgrade? Consider the following: What messages are you sending your kids about how to handle anxiety provoking situations? Do you pay attention to your “warning signs” and employ strategies to help you re-set? Or, do you ignore your well being and hear yourself using reactive, dismissive or catastrophic language? My husband and I were four sons into our parenting journey and still lacked an understanding about stress, effective coping skills and the power of communication, often repeating the same ineffective statements we heard as kids. If you asked my kids where they learned anxiety from, they’d all point to me. If you asked them where they learned anger, they’d point to their dad. Modeling and environment matter. Accepting these truths and being willing to make adjustments in our habits and ways of communicating cultivated a healthier environment for our family, strengthened us as parents, and ultimately empowered our sons. The same can...

The Ways Your Parenting Language and Approach Impact Your Child

Kids learn more from our examples than any lecture. This includes how we communicate, face obstacles, manage anxiety and accept feedback. This can be challenging on a “good day,” never mind during a pandemic. If there were ever a time when kids are looking to parents for ways to process and interpret the uncertainty and fear associated with the current health crisis, it’s now. If there were ever a time when parents needed information and support to help them do just that, it’s now. Concurrently, there’s a powerful opportunity for you to learn about the brain and use that knowledge to your advantage in your parenting. How do you know if your parenting approach could use an upgrade? Consider the following: What messages are you sending your kids about how to handle anxiety provoking situations? Do you pay attention to your “warning signs” and employ strategies to help you re-set? Or, do you ignore your well being and hear yourself using reactive, dismissive or catastrophic language? My husband and I were four sons into our parenting journey and still lacked an understanding about stress, effective coping skills and the power of communication, often repeating the same ineffective statements we heard as kids. If you asked my kids where they learned anxiety from, they’d all point to me. If you asked them where they learned anger, they’d point to their dad. Modeling and environment matter. Accepting these truths and being willing to make adjustments in our habits and ways of communicating cultivated a healthier environment for our family, strengthened us as parents, and ultimately empowered our sons. The same can...

Empower Your Parenting with Less Anxiety

  I was four sons into motherhood and still hadn’t reckoned with my anxiety. I hadn’t gotten help, mainly  because I had no awareness I could have any power over my anxiety and didn’t have a clue anxiety was treatable. My anxiety was on spin cycle…What if my sons didn’t like school or played too many video games? What if they got hurt in contact sports? Was their diet healthy enough? Was the youngest child getting ripped off…when was the last time I read that child a book? And fast forward several years…What if they crashed the car? (they did). Catastrophic thinking, “what ifs,” and fears of uncertainty and imperfection seemed “normal” parts of my day I’d just have to get used to. Physiological manifestations—rapid heart rate, jumpy knees and tight chest—were sensations I’d just had to live with…permanently. How wrong was I. When one of my sons was diagnosed with post concussion syndrome, I immersed myself into a world of neuroscience and learned about the impact of stress on the brain. For the first time, I became aware that an anxiety disorder was a combination of nature and nurture. Whoa! This nurture part was breaking news and sparked a new way of thinking about my anxiety: I couldn’t change my genes, but I could change my environment. To do this, I had to take an honest look at how anxiety was affecting my parenting. This was a wakeup call moment, and it might be for you as well. Our children are sponges and interpret the world by how we face situations. Not only did I want to begin...

Empower Your Parenting with Less Anxiety

I was four sons into motherhood and still hadn’t reckoned with my anxiety. I hadn’t gotten help, mainly  because I had no awareness I could have any power over my anxiety and didn’t have a clue anxiety was treatable. My anxiety was on spin cycle…What if my sons didn’t like school or played too many video games? What if they got hurt in contact sports? Was their diet healthy enough? Was the youngest child getting ripped off…when was the last time I read that child a book? And fast forward several years…What if they crashed the car? (they did). Catastrophic thinking, “what ifs,” and fears of uncertainty and imperfection seemed “normal” parts of my day I’d just have to get used to. Physiological manifestations—rapid heart rate, jumpy knees and tight chest—were sensations I’d just had to live with…permanently. How wrong was I. When one of my sons was diagnosed with post concussion syndrome, I immersed myself into a world of neuroscience and learned about the impact of stress on the brain. For the first time, I became aware that an anxiety disorder was a combination of nature and nurture. Whoa! This nurture part was breaking news and sparked a new way of thinking about my anxiety: I couldn’t change my genes, but I could change my environment. To do this, I had to take an honest look at how anxiety was affecting my parenting. This was a wakeup call moment, and it might be for you as well. Our children are sponges and interpret the world by how we face situations. Not only did I want to begin managing...

The 11 Thought Leaders That Parents Should Know

When your child is born, so is your parenthood journey. These days, as a parent you may find yourself working harder than ever as you adapt to new ways of navigating your home, work, and social life. That’s why I want to provide you with a cheat sheet of thought leaders who can support you with the cognitive, emotional, social, academic, and character development of your children. When given the awesome responsibility of parenthood, you have no idea where this journey will take you… whether your child will show signs of anxiety or depression…whether they’ll have trouble organizing themselves, making transitions, staying focused, or self-regulating. In your commitment to caring for and nurturing your child unconditionally, you rely on the level of knowledge and skills you have at the time. If you’re like me, much of the knowledge I had was inaccurate, incomplete, or misunderstood. I honestly didn’t know what I didn’t know. One of my biggest discoveries as a parent and educator was learning about the brain, especially the connection of emotion to learning and the power of environment in developing mindsets, habits, self-talk, and skills. You can’t change your kid’s genes, but you can shape their environment. So, I am here to empower you. But I can’t do it alone. Let’s meet 11 thought leaders that changed my life and learn ways they can enhance your parenthood journey. Judy Willis, Neurologist, University of California, Santa Barbara Author of How Your Child Learns Best: Brain-Based Ways to Ignite Learning and Increase School Success. “ I [we] wake up with a new brain everyday and it is up to...